A Sadist

Meet Nate Sawyer.

The perfect kid. That is no exaggeration. He really is. So perfect that it made you queasy with envy. The whole package; quite a remarkable specimen. Tall, dark haired, gorgeous, and a body like one of those on the front of a Men’s Health magazine designed to make you self-conscious of your meagre frame. His perfection manifested itself in every wake of life, believe it or not. He was the school jock. He placed in the top three academic performers in the grade. Worst of all? He was insufferably charming and polite. It was impossible to hate the kid, no matter how desperately you wish you did.

Perhaps if you knew more, knew what did…you may just find that hatred.

Continue reading “A Sadist”

Advertisements

Don’t Hide Your Work From The World

I know a fair amount of writers. By that I don’t necessarily mean that these people write books, but they write. They’re a mix of journalists, passionate writers, bloggers, novelists and editors. It doesn’t really matter what the objective is. They’re writers. It’s as simple as that.

One of the most common problems I’ve found among said writers is a vice that to some degree many of us have buried down somewhere. It’s the fear of having our work exposed, critiqued, ridiculed or torn down by an outside party. It’s the vulnerability we face by putting our writing out there and having its fate rest in the hands of its beholders. It’s the fear of what you do and love to do leaving the safety of your mind. It’s the fear of judgement day.

Continue reading “Don’t Hide Your Work From The World”

The Use Of Profanity In Writing

Profanity is an interesting topic to me because of people’s vastly different reactions to it both in real life and literature. Some people cringe and can’t take swear words at all, others aren’t bothered by them in the slightest and some people consider them only to be effective when used in a good context. You even get those who feel profanity is a crutch for the inarticulate.

I don’t quite fall on any particular side in this debate because I’m totally an advocate for freedom in writing and creating art with as little rules as possible. But I do like to entertain all sides of the discussion.

My desire to talk about the topic arose recently when out of interest I checked the ‘fuck’ count in my upcoming book, The Black Glass Killer, and discovered that the word appeared a whopping 150 times in the novel so far, and that number can go up or down during the editing process.

Continue reading “The Use Of Profanity In Writing”

Artists, Be Rid Of Your Fear Of Judgment

We all want to be liked by others, or perhaps more accurately we’d all like some kind of validation from other people. Whether or not you care much for other people, it’s almost an inherent desire that we want to be noticed. Yet, contradictory to that notion for many is that some are afraid of being noticed, nine times out of ten because there is a fear of being judged or ridiculed by other voices. As a person, let alone an artist, this is a dangerous barrier to not only personal growth, but to expressing yourself freely. And it’s my belief that as an artist you absolutely cannot stand to be afraid of judgment or let the feelings and whims of others dictate your desire to express your art.

Continue reading “Artists, Be Rid Of Your Fear Of Judgment”

Dealing With Audience Oversensitivity As An Artist

In the world we live in today one of the greatest dangers facing artistic expression and creative freedom is often declared to be the oversensitivity of the audience, especially on the internet. Controversial material, whether through humour or graphic or television or writing, is constantly under threat of scrutiny often not for the actual quality of the art, but for whether it should be allowed to exist. In other words, whether it’s acceptable. This is a problem that all artists must face, and it’s especially important in a time where censorship is an always looming danger yet the volume of material is at an all time high and barriers to entry at a lovable low.

Continue reading “Dealing With Audience Oversensitivity As An Artist”

How Poetry Can Improve Creative Flow

I’ve always had a deep love for rhyming. Ask anyone I’m close to and they’d confirm that when I’m in the mood I can go off on rhyming tangents that last minutes, often packed with silliness. When I was really small I used to write poems or little limericks for my parents on their birthdays. As I grew older I privately tried my hand at song writing and eventually poetry, some of which featured in one of my first — and currently shelved — books, Darklight, which is a supernatural story I plan on revisiting some day. It’s tricky to explain in words, which is funny to say as an actual writer, but there’s a creative purity, or unique flow, to poetry that truly can help unlock any closed gates in your mind when searching for some consistency in your art.

Continue reading “How Poetry Can Improve Creative Flow”

Is Attachment To Your Characters A Weakness?

In life we know that letting go is one of the most difficult things you can do. As it is in reality, so too is that truth relevant in fiction. We become attached to other people or objects, whether real or not. We become invested in characters and stories we’ve followed for a long time. Sometimes that emotional investment clouds our perceptions, and other times it results in us not wanting a certain world to close or story to end, even when a conclusion is perhaps a necessity, or the overall quality of what we’re enjoying has certainly taken a nose dive. We are ultimately beings of intimate emotion and tangible feelings, striving for connection. But is there a point where this need for attachment becomes too much in the creative process? Is there a point where it begins to harm your narrative, and becomes a weakness? Or is it a writer’s strength in bringing their characters to life?

Continue reading “Is Attachment To Your Characters A Weakness?”